Lada's Labyrinth


 

 

Lada is the early Croatian goddess of beauty and love who embodies natural birthing forces. Her companions are nymphs known as Ladarice, who have left the world to settle among the stars. This is how open star cluster Pleiades, meaning 'to sail', also known as the Seven Sisters was created.

 In the ancient Mediterranean world, the day that the Pleaides cluster first appeared in the morning sky before sunrise announced the opening of the navigation season.

This stone labyrinth is a replica of the labyrinth at Pula in Italy.  

 

This labyrinth has a dual entrance/exit. 

This labyrinth has a dual entrance/exit. 

Locals tell me that this replica was built about 60 years ago. 

Locals tell me that this replica was built about 60 years ago. 

Those go everywhere Keen sandals.

Those go everywhere Keen sandals.

The Kermes oak tree shading one side of the labyrinth  

The Kermes oak tree shading one side of the labyrinth  

National Geographic photo from Croatia from Above. 

National Geographic photo from Croatia from Above. 

Last year, while waiting in Split for a ferry I came across the National Geographic publication, Croatia From Above. All the photography was done by Croatia travel writer, Davor Rostuhar. He has since become one of my favourite authors. I bought the NG book and Rostuhar's "The Journeys Magic". It took quite a bit of googling to find where the labyrinth was, but I had already decided, wherever it was I was going to visit it in 2019. This Labyrinth, Lada's Labyrinth and several others are all tucked away in the forest in the north of Cres Island. I also discovered they have a volunteer program. I will try to join their program next year as it's too late to join for this years program. 

Lada's Labyrinth is basically square and its entrance and exit are adjacent. When walking the labyrinth most turns are at right angles, there are very few 'U turns' in this labyrinth. It takes about 40 minutes to walk the labyrinth plus time in the middle, depending on your purpose. The stones have probably been in situ for 50 years, the path is basically a carpet of wild mint, on one side some bracken has crept in but there are enough walkers to keep its growth under control. On another side under the beauiful old Kermes oak tree, as you walk there is the soft crush of last autumns oak leaves. Cres Islands version of the dung beetle is also very busy. I didn't actually see any fly out of their dung/dirt piles but you could see the holes they use. The whole dung beetle thing is another of Mother Natures' miracles.

 

Dung beetles at work  

Dung beetles at work