Nicola Tesla Technical Museum

Nicola Tesla was born in Croatia and attended primary and technical schools in Croatia until he was drawn further afield to find people that matched his intellect.  

In Zagreb alone there are streets named after him, bronze sculptures and a museum acknowledging his contributions to shedding the light. 

 

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Zagrebs Nicola Tesla Technical Museum is a beauty. As well as having a large area devoted to him there are some wonderful collections of aeroplanes, boats and trains, to name a few.  

Teslas family home on the left and the Church where his Dad was the minster on the right. He grew up in Gospic, in central Croatia.  

Teslas family home on the left and the Church where his Dad was the minster on the right. He grew up in Gospic, in central Croatia.  

Another bronze sculpture of Tesla  

Another bronze sculpture of Tesla  

This exhibition is interactive, and he sits patiently in the corner.  

This exhibition is interactive, and he sits patiently in the corner.  

A display reminding me of my failed magneto!  

A display reminding me of my failed magneto!  

Great quote!!  

Great quote!!  

Albatres, small plane. Some think I am an Albatross, they meet and mate for life.

Albatres, small plane. Some think I am an Albatross, they meet and mate for life.

Small plane details!  

Small plane details!  

Croatias first green car. PS. It's electric  

Croatias first green car. PS. It's electric  

More planes.  

More planes.  

Sailing ship from the early 1900's, just like the two ships the Unkovic brothers bought when they returned from two years working in the forests in Australia. 

Sailing ship from the early 1900's, just like the two ships the Unkovic brothers bought when they returned from two years working in the forests in Australia. 

Croatian version of a treadle Singer sewing machine.  

Croatian version of a treadle Singer sewing machine.  

I love the simplicity of this ironing board. Still not enough to convince me to take up ironing!!  

I love the simplicity of this ironing board. Still not enough to convince me to take up ironing!!  

yuck! An old dentists chair!! 

yuck! An old dentists chair!! 

Now this is really interesting. Foucaults Pendulum.  

Now this is really interesting. Foucaults Pendulum.  

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page 106, Kindred, a cradle mountain love story by Kate Legge 

page 106, Kindred, a cradle mountain love story by Kate Legge 

The rate of rotation of a Foucault pendulum can be stated mathematically as equal to the rate of rotation of the Earth times the sine of the number of degrees of latitude. Because the Earth rotates once a sidereal day, or 360° approximately every 24 hours, its rate of rotation may be expressed as 15° per hour, which corresponds to the rate of rotation of a Foucault pendulum at the North or South Pole. At latitude 30° N—for example, at Cairo or New Orleans—a Foucault pendulum would rotate at the rate of 7.5° per hour, for the sine of 30° is equal to one-half. The rate of rotation of a Foucault pendulum at any given point is, in fact, numerically equal to the component of the Earth’s rate of rotation perpendicular to the Earth’s surface at that point.